Tag Archives: scope

A Reason Waivers Sometime Fail — Incident is Beyond the Scope of a Waiver and/or Not Within the Contemplation of Plaintiff

By Doyice Cotten

We know that in most states, a well-written waiver of liability will protect a sport, recreation, or fitness provider from liability for injuries to an adult resulting from the ordinary negligence of the provider. Such waivers, however, are not limitless; there are situations and circumstances in which even a well-written waiver will fail to provide protection for the negligent provider. The following Illinois appellate case (Offord v. Fitness International, LLC,,2015) illustrates one circumstance in which a waiver fails to protect.

Drowning on a College Study Abroad Illustrates North Carolina Waiver Law

 

By Doyice Cotten

Ravi Thackurdeen drowned while swimming at a Costa Rican beach at the end of a college study abroad while enrolled at Duke University and the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS). His parents sued both entities alleging wrongful death and negligence (including gross negligence) (Thackurdeen v. Duke Univ., 2018).

The students were taken on a “celebratory trip” to the beach on the last day of the trip.

Even Broadly Worded Waivers Are not Without Limitations

By Doyice Cotten

Many, or even most, waivers are written in such a manner as to include seemingly all mishaps that can occur to the client. There are many cases illustrating that the power of a liability waiver is not unlimited.

In a 2015 Illinois case (Hawkins v. Capital Fitness, Inc.), Hawkins signed the following waiver:

 

“MEMBER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT EXERCISE, TANNING AND USE OF THE EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES OF THE COMPANY OR OF THEIR AFFILIATES NATURALLY INVOLVES THE RISK OF INJURY AND MEDICAL DISORDERS,

A Cursory Look at Illinois Waiver Law

By Doyice Cotten

Note: This posting is not intended to provide a comprehensive presentation on Illinois waiver law, but rather to offer the reader a brief look at what some of the courts have said about waivers and their enforcement.

Contracts

Illinois courts construe contracts to give effect to the intention of the parties as expressed in the language of the agreement. Illinois law construes contracts as a whole, and generally disallows extrinsic evidence unless an ambiguity exists within the contract’s four corners (Platt v.