Tag Archives: horseback riding

Your Good Friend Will Not Sue You! REALLY!!! – Check this Missouri Trail Ride Case

By Doyice Cotten

 Deanna Perkinson was on a trail ride with a good friend and several others when the horse her friend (Sarah Courson) was riding suddenly kicked her; the result was a broken bone and two subsequent surgeries (Perkinson v. Courson, 2018). The incident occurred during a ride organized by Cross Country Trail Ride, LLC,  in Eminence, Missouri.

The two women lived in Illinois (where this suit was filed),

Connecticut Court Admits Waiver to Show Plaintiff Knew the Inherent Risk of Horseback Riding

By Doyice J. Cotten

Stefana Pecher took riding lesson at Showtime Stables which was owned by Rhea Distefano. After about six lessons, the horse ridden by Pecher was acting lazy, was not obeying commands, and was reacting slowly. She was told by the instructor to use the crop to tap lightly on the shoulder of the horse; the horse bolted, causing her to fall and injure herself.

During the trial, the defense entered into evidence a photo of a warning sign posted at eye level at the barn door and a liability waiver signed by the plaintiff.

Provider’s Cavalier Attitude toward Safety and Risk Management Proves Costly

By Doyice Cotten  

Two major problems with liability waivers are that they are sometimes misunderstood and misused by owners or managers of sport businesses. First, some sport managers think that a liability waiver provides total protection against lawsuits for injury. They think they are completely protected against loss. But waivers do not always work! Sometimes there are statutes prohibiting their use (e.g., G.O.L 5-326 in NY prohibiting waivers when there is an entry fee). Sometimes the waiver is poorly written (e.g.,

Redacted Waivers in New York Help Protect

By Doyice Cotten

New York’s highest court has stated that disclaimers or releases of liability are looked upon with disfavor; however, absent conflict with statute or public policy, courts will enforce such contracts (Gross v. Sweet, 1979).  Factors used in determining enforcement include: 1) intent of the parties, 2) clearness and comprehensibility of the language, 3) parties’ awareness of the agreement, and 4) the frequency with which the releases appear in the type of transaction under consideration.

Resorts, Tours, and Agency Law

By Doyice Cotten

It is common practice for hotels and resorts around the world to offer optional tours to guests through activity providers. These types of tours include such activities as snorkeling, nature tours, tubing, sightseeing, and any number of other activities. It is not uncommon for a guest to be injured on such tours and seek compensation from the hotel/resort. Whether the injured guest wins or not depends upon the relationship between the hotel/resort and the activity provider – whether the provider is an agent of the hotel/resort or is an independent contractor operating on its own.