Tag Archives: California

A Perfect Electronic Waiver will not Protect if the Provider cannot Authenticate the Electronic Signature

By Doyice Cotten

In several previous posts (including Established Protocol for Administering an Electronic Waiver Protects Fair when Participant is Killed), this author has commented on how the validity of electronic waivers is dependent upon following procedures by which the electronic signature of the participant can be shown to be authentic.

Facts of the Case

In each of the articles, cases in which the electronic waiver has been enforced are reported.

An Outline of the Assumption of the Risk Doctrine in California

By Doyice Cotten

The doctrine of assumption of risk provides liability protection for sport and recreation providers in many states. This post attempts to summarize or outline the doctrine in California and show how liability waivers fit in. Your state may be similar or your state may be one in which the doctrine is no longer followed. This outline is drawn from statements in Knight v. Jewett (1992), an important California Supreme Court case and a few more cases as noted.

Helping Providers to Understand a Major Defense: Assumption of Risk

 

This article was originally published on Recreation-Law.com, an excellent newsletter dealing with outdoor sport and recreation law. Its author, James H. Moss, J.D., is a well-known attorney specializing in the outdoor recreation industry. Jim has kindly granted permission to reprint the article.

Even Hikers Sue for their Injuries

By James H. Moss, J.D.

Citation: Kalter, et al., v. Grand Circle Travel, et al., 631 F.Supp.2d 1253 (C.D.Cal. 2009)

State: California, United States District Court,

Established Protocol for Administering Electronic Waiver Protects Fair When Participant is Killed

By Doyice Cotten

The 28th District, an agency in the State of California, organizes and operates the San Bernardino County Fair and owns and operates the event location. The fair’s attractions are owned and operated by independent vendors. The vendor in this case, FD Event, owned and operated the “Free Drop Experience.” It involved jumping off scaffolding 36 feet high onto a stuntman airbag. When constructing the scaffolding for the May, 2015, fair the platform at the top was eliminated because it seemed to add too much stress to the tower.

The Difference Between Ordinary Negligence and Gross Negligence

By Doyice Cotten

Most sport, recreation, and fitness professionals have an idea (though they are often incorrect) of what constitutes ordinary negligence. Many understand that

ordinary negligence is the failure to exercise the level of care that someone of ordinary prudence would have exercised under the same circumstances. Many understand that negligence is indicated by  inattention, irresponsibility, and actions that are careless.  

A California federal court (Kabogoza v. Blue Water Boating,

AEDs Required in California Schools that Offer Interscholastic Athletics

By Doyice Cotten

In 2018, California passed a law mandating that all public schools or charter schools that offer interscholastic athletics must have at least one automated external defibrillator (AED) – effective July 1, 2019. Interestingly, the legislature did not provide funding for the devices, but noted that existing law authorizes a public school to solicit and receive nonstate funds to acquire and maintain an automated external defibrillator (AED).

There has been considerable complaint about the fact that this law requires an AED,

California: When a Provider Increases the Inherent Risks of the Activity

By Doyice Cotten

Jim McNeil was a professional motocross rider and jumper; he was killed in an incident in which he was attempting to make a 75 foot jump over a motorhome (McNeil v. Freestylemx.com, 2016). His motorcycle had a loss of power and his flight fell short of the landing ramp. He had performed similar jumps in about 250 shows. In an earlier litigation, this court declined to grant the defendant’s bid for summary judgment because there was an issue of fact as to whether McNeil had actually signed the waiver.

Failure to Properly Name Protected Parties Results in a Reversal in Favor of the Plaintiff

By Doyice Cotten

Bradford Jones and his son Forbes collided with each other while riding jet skis. Bradford was injured and subsequently sued both The Barge, LLC and its owner David Hubert. The trial court granted summary judgment in favor of defendants based on the liability waiver signed by Jones prior to the ride. It should be noted that the waiver listed The Barge, LLC as a protected party, but the ownership and legal status of the business had changed several times over the years and at the time of the accident,

Risk Management Fiasco in Management of California Half Marathon

By Doyice Cotten

Hundreds of running-related events are held each year. They include 5k runs, mile runs, marathons, half marathons, and events that include other activities such as the triathlon. There is risk in all of these, but most promoters take care to manage the risk as well as possible.

In a huge  half marathon/5K run in California involving about 10,000 participants, a runner collapsed seconds after completion of the half marathon and died a few minutes later (Hass v.

Importance of Listing all Protected Parties in Your Waiver

By Doyice Cotten

Bradford Jones and his son, Forbes, rented jet skis from The Barge, LLC, owned by David Hubert. As they began riding, Bradford was injured when he turned suddenly and stopped in front of the inexperienced boy’s jet ski.  They collided, Jones was injured, and they subsequently sued The Barge, LLC, and Hubert.

Hubert had bought the business in 2006 and became the sole owner when he bought out his partner and renamed the business The Barge Watercraft Rentals.