Tag Archives: California

Weakness in AED Statute Focuses on a Problem

Estiban Mejia suffered a fatal cardiac arrest while exercising at a 24 Hour Fitness gym. A California statute (H&S Code sec. 104113) requires that every “health studio” acquire an  automatic external defibrillator (AED) and train personnel to use the AED. Mejia’s estate (collectively, plaintiffs) sued the alleged owners and operators of the gym alleging among other claims, that the club failed to comply with the statute. The trial court entered a judgment in favor of the club. This is the appeal.

3-inch Gap in Sauna Floor: Was It Ordinary or Gross Negligence?

By Doyice Cotten

Cynthia MacAdams, age 75, signed a YMCA waiver prior to using the sauna. The floor consisted of two separate platforms made of wood slats on top of a concrete base; they could be lifted and pushed apart for cleaning, but were not pushed back together after cleaning. This resulted in a 3 inch gap in the flooring.  When she got ready to leave, one of her feet went into the gap causing her to fall onto her right side.

Gross Negligence Claim in California Motocross Case Fails

By Doyice Cotten

Scott Champion and some other motocross racers filed suit against Feld Entertainment, Inc. claiming injury because defendants, in order to dry the track, used caustic lime on the soil and failed to mix it properly (Champion v. Feld Motor Sports, Inc., 2021). Feld argued that the waiver signed by plaintiffs protected against claims for ordinary negligence; further, plaintiffs failed to plead gross negligence.

California Gross Negligence Law

The Court then set out to ascertain whether plaintiff has sufficiently stated a claim.

California “Boot-Camp” Fitness Patron’s Gross Negligence Claim Fails

By Doyice Cotten

Patricia Washington was injured in a “boot-camp” group fitness class taught by Alisson Rosales (Washington v. Rosales, 2020). The trial court granted summary judgment in favor of the defendant, Rosales based on the waiver of liability signed by Washington. She claimed the waiver was rendered invalid by the Health Studio Services Act (Civ. Code, § 1812.80 et. seq.). In addition, she said the court erred by shifting the burden to her to demonstrate a triable issue of fact on the issue of gross negligence.

A Perfect Electronic Waiver will not Protect if the Provider cannot Authenticate the Electronic Signature

By Doyice Cotten

In several previous posts (including Established Protocol for Administering an Electronic Waiver Protects Fair when Participant is Killed), this author has commented on how the validity of electronic waivers is dependent upon following procedures by which the electronic signature of the participant can be shown to be authentic.

Facts of the Case

In each of the articles, cases in which the electronic waiver has been enforced are reported.

An Outline of the Assumption of the Risk Doctrine in California

By Doyice Cotten

The doctrine of assumption of risk provides liability protection for sport and recreation providers in many states. This post attempts to summarize or outline the doctrine in California and show how liability waivers fit in. Your state may be similar or your state may be one in which the doctrine is no longer followed. This outline is drawn from statements in Knight v. Jewett (1992), an important California Supreme Court case and a few more cases as noted.

Helping Providers to Understand a Major Defense: Assumption of Risk

 

This article was originally published on Recreation-Law.com, an excellent newsletter dealing with outdoor sport and recreation law. Its author, James H. Moss, J.D., is a well-known attorney specializing in the outdoor recreation industry. Jim has kindly granted permission to reprint the article.

Even Hikers Sue for their Injuries

By James H. Moss, J.D.

Citation: Kalter, et al., v. Grand Circle Travel, et al., 631 F.Supp.2d 1253 (C.D.Cal. 2009)

State: California, United States District Court,

Established Protocol for Administering Electronic Waiver Protects Fair When Participant is Killed

By Doyice Cotten

The 28th District, an agency in the State of California, organizes and operates the San Bernardino County Fair and owns and operates the event location. The fair’s attractions are owned and operated by independent vendors. The vendor in this case, FD Event, owned and operated the “Free Drop Experience.” It involved jumping off scaffolding 36 feet high onto a stuntman airbag. When constructing the scaffolding for the May, 2015, fair the platform at the top was eliminated because it seemed to add too much stress to the tower.

The Difference Between Ordinary Negligence and Gross Negligence

By Doyice Cotten

Most sport, recreation, and fitness professionals have an idea (though they are often incorrect) of what constitutes ordinary negligence. Many understand that

ordinary negligence is the failure to exercise the level of care that someone of ordinary prudence would have exercised under the same circumstances. Many understand that negligence is indicated by  inattention, irresponsibility, and actions that are careless.  

A California federal court (Kabogoza v. Blue Water Boating,

AEDs Required in California Schools that Offer Interscholastic Athletics

By Doyice Cotten

In 2018, California passed a law mandating that all public schools or charter schools that offer interscholastic athletics must have at least one automated external defibrillator (AED) – effective July 1, 2019. Interestingly, the legislature did not provide funding for the devices, but noted that existing law authorizes a public school to solicit and receive nonstate funds to acquire and maintain an automated external defibrillator (AED).

There has been considerable complaint about the fact that this law requires an AED,