Tag Archives: protected parties

Importance of Listing all Protected Parties in Your Waiver

By Doyice Cotten

Bradford Jones and his son, Forbes, rented jet skis from The Barge, LLC, owned by David Hubert. As they began riding, Bradford was injured when he turned suddenly and stopped in front of the inexperienced boy’s jet ski.  They collided, Jones was injured, and they subsequently sued The Barge, LLC, and Hubert.

Hubert had bought the business in 2006 and became the sole owner when he bought out his partner and renamed the business The Barge Watercraft Rentals.

Your Good Friend Will Not Sue You! REALLY!!! – Check this Missouri Trail Ride Case

By Doyice Cotten

 Deanna Perkinson was on a trail ride with a good friend and several others when the horse her friend (Sarah Courson) was riding suddenly kicked her; the result was a broken bone and two subsequent surgeries (Perkinson v. Courson, 2018). The incident occurred during a ride organized by Cross Country Trail Ride, LLC,  in Eminence, Missouri.

The two women lived in Illinois (where this suit was filed),

Good Waivers Fail; Bad Waivers Protect — SOMETIMES

By Doyice Cotten

In Waivers & Releases of Liability (7th ed.), this author devotes two entire chapters (More than 50 pages) to how to write an effective waiver. One can construct a great waiver by following the guidelines presented. However, waivers don’t always work as expected. In case law we find that some very poor waivers successfully protect the provider, and we find that on occasion, very good waivers fail to protect for one reason or another. In this article,

Failing Waiver Language: Too Broad and Too Narrow

By Doyice Cotten

Waivers may fail for a number of reasons. Over the last several years it seems that there is a rash of failures because the waiver was 1) too narrowly constructed, 2), overly broad or 3) did not specifically name a party seeking protection. Seldom, however, does a waiver fail for all 3 deficiencies – as is the case in this instance.

In Fisher v. Stevens (2003 S.C. App. LEXIS 109), Stevens (the wrecker driver) was responding to an accident on the race track.

Failure to Name Party Costly

Waivers and releases of liability can fail to protect for many reasons. Releases in three 2009 cases failed to protect because the waiver did not name the protected parties either by name or by function. These three cases can give sport, recreation, and fitness providers some guidance in writing a waiver or in evaluating a waiver currently in use.

Porter v. Dartmouth College

In Porter v. Dartmouth College (2009 U.S. Dist.