18 Tips for Reducing the Risk of a Lawsuit (Part II – Facility & Equipment)

This is the second of a 5-part series on ways to reduce the risk of a lawsuit. This part will focus on guidelines dealing with the facility and equipment.

5.         Establish a Complete Facility Inspection Program

The inspection program should be broad in scope, including several types of inspections. There should be a daily inspection. This does not have to be time consuming or detailed, but someone should take a few minutes before opening to walk through the facility with a brief checklist to see if there are any obvious hazards or problems visible.

Staying in the Field and Out of the Courthouse

by Charles R. Gregg

Reb Gregg is a leading attorney, lecturer and writer in legal liability issues for adventure, education and recreation based outdoor programs. He is a true expert in the area of risk management.

The primary purpose of a risk management plan is not the avoidance of legal liability. Rather, it is the maintenance of a quality program; that is, one which deals reasonably and fairly with its clients or students and their families.

Court in Trail Ride Case Gives Advice on Preparing Waivers

The Cohen v. Five Brooks Stable court (2008 Cal. App. LEXIs 222) gave some sound advice to writers of waivers. While acknowledging that California courts hold releases of liability to a high standard of clarity, the court emphasized that “An effective release is hard to draft only if the party for whom it is prepared desires to hide the ball, which is what the law is designed to prevent. . . . A release that forthrightly makes clear to a person untrained in the law that the releasor gives up any claim against the releasee for the latter’s own negligence .

Minnesota Court Enforces Waiver Signed by Parent

Minnesota joined the list of states that have enforced a liability waiver which was signed by a parent on behalf of a minor child (Moore v. Minnesota Baseball Instructional  School, 2009 Minn. App. Unpub. LEXIS 299).  Moore signed a waiver for her son releasing the Minnesota Baseball Instructional School from liability arising from injury or loss caused by negligence or otherwise while participating in such activity or while upon the premises.

The minor suffered the loss of vision in one eye while throwing woodchips during a free period.

Why Some Waivers Fail

Keeping waivers crystal clear can protect you from lawsuits.

Some waivers are upheld when challenged in a court of law, while others are not. Why do some waivers pass and some fail? All waivers must meet the standard of being clear and unambiguous, and the most frequent reason for failure is that the waiver was ambiguous and poorly written. The following four cases illustrate two well-written waivers and two poorly written waivers.

18 Tips for Reducing the Risk of a Lawsuit (Part I – Staff Selection & Training)

You can do many things to reduce the risk of a lawsuit in your fitness center. Here are some important first steps.
Many fitness center operators are fearful of being sued. And those who aren’t, should be! Even if you use a waiver and have insurance, a lawsuit is bad news. You have a big headache that will drain your attention and your peace-of-mind. In addition, the process of defending a lawsuit usually lasts for several years. Even if you eventually win, you have had the worry and, often, an abundance of bad publicity. Financially, your insurance may not cover the claim, and your rates will probably go up. All in all, it is better to avoid a suit in the first place. You can do many things to reduce the risk of an injury and a subsequent lawsuit in your fitness center.

Liability Waivers 101

What is a waiver and how is it used? Do they work? Why do they fail? How do I write an effective waiver? Get the Answers! Liability waivers, contrary to misconceptions of providers in the past, can be effective in protecting providers from liability for injuries resulting from the negligence of the provider. Waivers are inexpensive to obtain, easy to administer and store, and can help protect providers from the consequences of their own mistakes.

About Risk Management

How do I control risk in my sport related business? Get the facts about Risk Management. Risk management is an on-going process by which a business or corporate entity attempts to control the programmatic and financial risks in order to reduce costs, enable desirable programming, and provide financial stability.

You Have Identified a Risk — What Now?

You should be able to identify the risks facing your facility. The question is, what do you do about a risk once it is identified? Whether it be a property exposure, liability for negligence or otherwise, or regarding business operations, management must determine the extent of the risk by examining the following: 1) its potential severity (possible impact on the corporation functioning and possible seriousness of a resulting injury), and 2) the likelihood of the risk or injury occurring. After determining the extent of the risk, four control approaches are available.