Tag Archives: risk management plan

Creating Your Risk Management Plan

Jim Moss is a practicing attorney specializing in outdoor recreation law; he has the informative website Recreation Law , on which this article was originally published.

Risk Management Plans always sound good; but, they often turn out to be a lot of work! On top of that, many plans turn out to be so cumbersome that they do not work in actual practice. Jim offers suggestions as to how to create a risk management plan that actually works in real life;

Staying in the Field and Out of the Courthouse (Revisited)

We are revisiting five of Reb Gregg’s previous posts on Sportwaiver.com. Nothing has changed since the article was originally posted. It provides important information for the service provider.

Doyice

by Charles R. Gregg

Reb Gregg is a leading attorney, lecturer and writer in legal liability issues for adventure, education and recreation based outdoor programs. He is a true expert in the area of risk management.

The primary purpose of a risk management plan is not the avoidance of legal liability.

Michigan Court Rules in Child Drowning Case (Pool Owner Not Liable) and Cheerleader Injury Case (Coaches and Organization May Be Held Liable)

By Alexander “Sandie” Pendleton of KMK

The Michigan Court of Appeals recently has issued decisions in two cases involving recreational liability (Estate of Wheeler v. Central Michigan Inns, Inc., April 14, 2011, and Sherry v. East Suburban Football League, March 17, 2011). Both decisions emphasize the importance of recreational-opportunity providers being vigilant about injury risks.

The Wheeler case arose out of the tragic drowning death of five-year-old Domonique “Dom” Wheeler.

18 Tips for Reducing the Risk of a Lawsuit (Part V – Basics of Risk Management)

This is the final part of a 5-part series of ways to reduce the risk of a lawsuit. This part focuses on guidelines dealing with the basic fundamentals of successful risk management.  Each subject encompasses an immense amount of subject matter.  See the sources cited for more information.

15.       Know and Adhere to Industry Standards[1]

Professionals are held to a standard of care that is deemed reasonable and any conduct that falls below that standard of care may leave the club liable for injuries or damages.