Tag Archives: minor

Mississippi Parental Waiver Law

By Doyice Cotten

Many businesses and organizations, like Mississippi State University, require parents to sign a liability waiver on behalf of their minor child or children. However, Mississippi law on the enforceability of such waivers is unclear.

The Mississippi Supreme Court stated in Khoury v. Saik (1948) that “It is well settled that the infant can waive none of his rights.”  It went on to say “Minors can waive nothing. In the law they are helpless,

A Look at Mississippi Waiver Law

By Doyice Cotten

Mississippi waiver law is not crystal clear in spite of several Supreme Court of Mississippi rulings. Some major considerations are addressed in the following.

Quinn v. Mississippi State University (1998)

An important liability waiver case addressed by the Mississippi Supreme Court (Quinn v. Mississippi State University, 1998) involved a 12-year-old baseball player at a summer baseball camp. The father and the boy signed a pre-printed liability waiver.

“Snow Cases”: PART III – Waivers Enforced in Skiing and Snow Boarding Cases

By Doyice Cotten

Five “Snow” cases have been presented in the previous two posts. Two more will be examined in this post.

Bagley v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc. (2013) – Colorado

This case was discussed in some detail in the February 11, 2013 post entitled “Oregon Addresses a Parental Waiver for the First Time.” The case involved a minor who reached the age of majority shortly after his father signed a liability waiver enabling him to snowboard on Mt.

Connecticut, California, and North Dakota Courts Address Parental Waivers

By Doyice Cotten

Recent 2013 cases in Connecticut, California, and North Dakota have addressed the question as to whether parents have the authority to sign away the rights of a minor to recover for injury resulting from the negligence of the provider.

California Case

Lotz v. The Claremont Club (2013 Cal. App. Unpub. LEXIS 5748) involved a 10 year-old who was injured in a dodgeball game. It is well established that California law allows the enforcement of parental waivers provided the waiver is unambiguous and meets court requirements.

Colorado Parental Waiver Statute Applied by Courts

By Doyice Cotten

In 2003, the Colorado legislature passed a statute providing that parents have the authority to contract, on behalf of their child, to relieve a provider from liability for its negligence in the event the child is injured during participation (C.R.S. 13-27-107 (2003). Among other things the statute provides

(IV) Parents make conscious choices every day on behalf of their children concerning the risks and benefits of participation in activities that may involve risk;

State Waiver Laws Differ: An Illustration

By Doyice Cotten

Just this week I was told by a health club employee that “Waivers are not worth the paper they are written on.” I had not heard that bit of erroneous information in some time; most sport, recreation, and fitness professionals today have at least a general idea that waivers can be effective in protecting an enterprise from liability for injuries.

The fact is that in at least 45 states, a well-written waiver signed by a assenting adult can effectively protect an activity provider from liability for injuries resulting from the ordinary negligence of the activity provider.

News Flash: Parental Waiver Enforced in Delaware

By Doyice Cotten

Jahndee Hong and her husband joined an athletic club and signed a liability waiver. In addition to the names of her and her husband,  the membership listed the names of all three of their children. Subsequently, she left her child playing on the indoor playground equipment at the club. He fell from a piece of equipment and broke his arm.

She filed suit alleging negligence by the club.( Hong v. Hockessin Athletic Club,

News Flash: Ruling on Parental Waivers in Indiana

By Doyice Cotten

[It is interesting (frustrating) that this Indiana case (and 2 more parental waiver cases to be addressed soon) have been recently published and found just days after a summary article for parental waivers appeared on this website.]

Facts

A 17-year-old girl playing in a summer baseball/softball league was injured while sliding into second base (Wabash County Young Men’s Christian Association, Inc.