Tag Archives: negligence

Is the Word “Negligence” Required for Waivers in New York Courts?

3081513320_6ef5ff9c6d_z

By Doyice Cotten

In 2016, Michelle Kalinkina, a professional model agreed to have a public haircut and styling demonstration. During the haircut, the stylist cut Kalinkina’s neck causing physical injury and scarring. She subsequently sued for damages alleging negligence and gross negligence (Kalinkina v. Martino Cartier Enterprises, LLC, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 95670).

Cartier provided a waiver signed by Kalinkina as a defense against the negligence claim. The waiver read:

I am providing modeling services for International Designs Corp.

University Study-Abroad Student Drowned in Costa Rica

33916936723_465cb8c7e2_z

By Doyice Cotten

Note: This is the third consecutive post (involving law in three states in three types of activity) in which assumption of risk has played a major role.

20-Year-old Erik Downes, college student at Oglethorpe University, drowned in the Pacific Ocean while he was in Costa Rica attending a study-abroad program. His parents brought a wrongful death suit against the university alleging negligence and gross negligence. Oglethorpe argued that 1) it owed no legal duty to Downes;

Bounce House Rental Waiver Protects One Stop Rental Tool and Party from Liability

36033170_722148c2fc_z

By Doyice Cotten

Richard Whitson rented an inflatable bounce house from the defendant, One Stop. Whitson had rented the house in the past.The bounce house weighs over 400 pounds and comes in a vinyl bag, uninflated.   The bag has a strap on the bottom and a cinch strap at the top to keep the bag closed. Whitson watched employees load the house into the back of his truck (Whitson v. One Stop Rental Tool & Party,

Poorly Written New York Church Waiver Fails

24776360805_77382f168b_z

By Doyice Cotten

Panagiota Melis, a member of the Helenic Orthodox Church, slipped and fell on snow and ice in the Church’s parking lot after parking her vehicle. She filed suit against the church alleging negligence (Melis v. Helenic Orthodox Community, 2017 N.Y. Misc. LEXIS 981).

The church claimed protection from a waiver and assumption of risk document signed previously by the plaintiff. The court ruled that General Obligations Law (“GOL”) 5-326 did not apply and did not serve to prevent the enforcement of the waiver because the church was not a place of amusement or recreation.

Risk Management in Today’s World (Revisited)

We are revisiting five of Reb Gregg’s previous posts on Sportwaiver.com. Nothing has changed since the article was originally posted. It provides important information for the service provider.

Doyice

Thanks to Reb Gregg for permission to publish this thought provoking treatise on risk management in today’s world. Reb would welcome discussion on the topic and we will be happy to post your comments on this site. Reb would like to know which of these issues, or others, are most significant for your sport,

Do Industry Standards Increase our Liability? (Revisited)

We are revisiting five of Reb Gregg’s previous posts on Sportwaiver.com. Nothing has changed since the article was originally posted. It provides important information for the service provider.

Doyice

Readers will find that this is one of the best pieces to be found relating to industry standards and liability. Our thanks go to author “Reb” Gregg and to Steve Smith who originally published the article in Touchstones – News and Resources for Outdoor Programs for permission to run the article in SportWaiver.com.

Duty and Liability (Revisited)

We are revisiting five of Reb Gregg’s previous posts on Sportwaiver.com. Nothing has changed since the article was originally posted. It provides important information for the service provider.

Doyice

by Charles R. Gregg

Readers will find that this to be an informative legal liability article. “Reb” Gregg is one of the nation’s top adventure law attorneys. This article originally appeared on Reb’s website.

Q. How do I run a good program without being sued?                                                                             

Check Your LIABILITY IQ: Was it Ordinary Negligence or Gross Negligence in Climbing Wall Case?

6313786637_76b8519ae1_z

By Doyice Cotten

In a Michigan rock wall climbing injury case (Alvarez v. LTF Club Operations Company Inc., 2016), the plaintiff had climbed the wall and started to belay down when his harness broke because he had it on backwards and incorrectly hooked to the belay system. He fell from the wall and was seriously injured. Subsequently, he filed suit claiming the waiver of liability of ordinary negligence he signed was not applicable because LTF was guilty of gross negligence.

Delaware Court Enforces Motocross Parental Waiver for Negligence but Not for Recklessness

16651361204_66ae0860fb_z

By Doyice Cotten

 

In 2013, Tommy Lynam (age 13), was riding a motocross bicycle at Blue Diamond Motocross near New Castle. While riding, Tommy rode off a jump, made a hard landing, and was unable to stop in time before colliding with a large metal shipping container. Lynam sued alleging negligence and recklessness (Lynam v. Blue Diamond Motocross LLC, 2016).

 

Lynam’s father had signed a waiver entitled “Parental Consent, Release and Waiver of Liability,

Group Waivers and the Risk of Fraud

3503549261_7d81f9e1a3_z.jpg

By Doyice Cotten

Scott Storer was injured while riding his motorcycle on a motocross track  (Storer v. E Street MX, Inc., 2015 Cal App. Unpub. LEXIS 4029). Prior to beginning his ride, Scott was handed a clipboard and asked to sign his name.

He said the only thing on the clipboard that he could see were names of other riders that signed in. He explained there was one folded sheet of paper with signature lines at the top of the clipboard,