Tag Archives: duty

A Waiver is not Always Necessary! Primary Assumption of Risk

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By Doyice Cotten

Kathleen Swigart entered a long distance horse riding event conducted by the American Endurance Ride Conference (AERC), a national governing and record-keeping body for “long distance horse riding.” An endurance ride is  “a highly competitive and demanding sport” in which the riders follow a specific course, collecting playing cards at set checkpoints along the route to verify having completed the entire course before crossing the finish line.

At the eight-mile checkpoint, seven horses were close together in a single line.

Duty and Liability (Revisited)

We are revisiting five of Reb Gregg’s previous posts on Sportwaiver.com. Nothing has changed since the article was originally posted. It provides important information for the service provider.

Doyice

by Charles R. Gregg

Readers will find that this to be an informative legal liability article. “Reb” Gregg is one of the nation’s top adventure law attorneys. This article originally appeared on Reb’s website.

Q. How do I run a good program without being sued?                                                                             

Understanding Negligence and Liability: “Determining Negligence” (Part 2)

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 By Doyice Cotten

In last week’s post Understanding Negligence and Liability (Part 1), we addressed this issue of negligence. This post presents another example to help the reader better understand the concept[1].

The following illustration regarding Happy Holiday Stables should help the reader to better understand what constitutes negligence.

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To illustrate, suppose Happy Holiday Stables rents a horse to a novice rider for a trail ride.

Understanding Negligence and Liability — (Part 1)

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By Doyice Cotten

Health clubs, personal trainers, rafting companies, parasail companies, trampoline parks, bowling alleys, skating rinks, city recreation departments, horseback riding stables, martial arts instructors, snowmobile providers, and ski resorts:  what do these entities have in common? They are all sport or recreation providers who should be concerned with liability. Each provides a service with which injuries are not uncommon. The question often asked is “If someone gets hurt, will I (or my company) by held liable and have to pay money?” The purpose of this brief article is to help the provider answer this question for him- or herself.

Duty and Liability

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by Charles R. Gregg

Readers will find that this to be an informative legal liability article. “Reb” Gregg is one of the nation’s top adventure law attorneys. This article originally appeared on Reb’s website.

Q. How do I run a good program without being sued?                                                                             

A. You can’t. People can and may sue you, with or without justification. And even the best program can make mistakes which might provoke the lawsuit.

Someone was Injured! Am I Liable?

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This article by Doyice Cotten originally appeared in Fitness Management.  Sport, fitness, and recreation professionals often describe a situation involving an injury and ask if they are liable.  This article will help others to quickly determine if he or she might be liable in an injury situation.

Robert Craig, a 75-year-old client, was injured when the “dip station” on which he was exercising tipped over.  When Craig and the station fell backward,